The Bones Tell A Tale

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Minimalist
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The Bones Tell A Tale

Post by Minimalist » Sat Apr 14, 2007 11:22 am

http://www.archaeology.org/0705/abstracts/isotopes.html

What makes strontium isotope analysis especially interesting for archaeologists is that the parts of the human body where the isotopes collect--tooth enamel and bone--are formed at different stages of a person's life. Tooth enamel forms in a child's first few years and does not change as a person ages, so the strontium isotope ratio of enamel matches the geology in the area where a person spent his or her childhood. By contrast, the strontium in bone gradually changes over a seven- to ten-year period and reveals the region where people spend the last decade of their lives. By matching the strontium isotope ratios in bones and teeth to those in specific geographic regions, Price is able to tell whether a person migrated between childhood and death, and sometimes can even pinpoint where the person was born.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

Frank Harrist

Post by Frank Harrist » Fri Jul 13, 2007 10:21 pm

Yep! :lol:

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Starflower
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Post by Starflower » Sun Jul 15, 2007 10:39 am

Missed this article myself while I was gone. This is the stuff that I find extremely fascinating. Using new technology to find out more detailed information about our past.
One of their most prominent studies addressed the origins of Yax K'uk Mo, who founded a dynasty in the Maya city of Copán in western Honduras. According to inscriptions, he arrived in Copán in A.D.. 426 when it was little more than a village. Some archaeologists had believed he came from Teotihuacán, an influential city in the Mexican highlands. After the king's tomb was discovered deep under a temple mound, Price's analysis revealed that he was born much closer to Copán, possibly in the Peten, the jungle of northern Guatemala.

"When I started this work with the isotopes, I didn't think people moved around very much. I thought they were pretty sedentary," says Price, "and I have changed 180 degrees as a result of this work. Almost every place we look we see a lot of mobility."
I was never happy with the prevailing theories(though the Luciferian link was humorous to say the least) on the origin of Yax K'uk Mo and am quite happy to see them debunked. I also had trouble believing that people were not very mobile. My own family has a history of gypsy like behavior going back as far as there are records and I don't think we are the only ones. I can't wait until they test more people in other parts of the world.
It is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.
-- Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World

"Give us the timber or we'll go all stupid and lawless on your butts". --Redcloud, MTF

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Cognito
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Post by Cognito » Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:38 am

I also had trouble believing that people were not very mobile. My own family has a history of gypsy like behavior going back as far as there are records and I don't think we are the only ones. I can't wait until they test more people in other parts of the world.
Star, most people's families are like that. People traveled all over the world from DAY ONE. Sheesh. Even H. erectus wound up in Georgia 1.8 million years ago without roads or a map. But scientists want to assume that people everywhere were settled and static. Big, big mistake in the use of grey matter (gray for you Yanks).:roll:
Natural selection favors the paranoid

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Digit
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Post by Digit » Tue Jul 17, 2007 7:12 am

Welcome to the club Star, no, not that one. My daughter had lived in five houses before she started school. I went to eleven schools! Wanting to know what is on the other side of the hill is, I believe, a basic human drive.

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