But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

The Western Hemisphere. General term for the Americas following their discovery by Europeans, thus setting them in contradistinction to the Old World of Africa, Europe, and Asia.

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E.P. Grondine

Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by E.P. Grondine » Fri Aug 17, 2012 7:23 am

There are already two known likely HSIE major geological structures.

I can not discuss the new candidate crater publicly here for the reasons stated.

IMO, the problem of the peopling of the Americas can be solved by looking at the mt DNA distributions. I've posted notes on them here at archaeologica, along with some rough dates.

The riddle wrapped up in an enigma may be occurring simply because the field is amazed at the answers they are getting from the data. Very early man in SE Asia being another example of this.

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Minimalist » Fri Aug 17, 2012 11:12 am

BTW, Farpoint....

The women in my group who run Facebook want to know if they can post your "golden with the cats" photo? I don't do FB myself....an enormous time suck and I'm busy enough.... but I have to humor them.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Farpoint » Fri Aug 17, 2012 4:37 pm

Minimalist wrote:BTW, Farpoint....

The women in my group who run Facebook want to know if they can post your "golden with the cats" photo? I don't do FB myself....an enormous time suck and I'm busy enough.... but I have to humor them.
Fair warning, I am PWI.

The women here say that that would be fine as long as they get proper billing; heh heh.

The golden is ELE; not a misspelling, figure it out.

The tuxedo kitty's formal name is Robert Tuvak, but we call him "Bob".

The gray tiger, who moves for no one, is Lobo.

If you look closely at the "golden with the cats" photo, there is a white paw at the bottom of the photo, that would be KC; pronounced "Casey".
Image

Link to my Flickr page

Please feel free to look at the other pixes, sets, on my Fickr page.
I'm sorry, my responses are limited. You must ask the right question.

"The track of a glacier is as unmistakable as that of a man or a bear, and is as significant and trustworthy as any other legible inscription"
John Strong Newberry; 1873

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Minimalist » Fri Aug 17, 2012 5:39 pm

ELE = Extinction Level Event?
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Farpoint » Sat Aug 18, 2012 3:32 am

Minimalist wrote:ELE = Extinction Level Event?
"He shall know your ways as if born to them."

You are correct, you know me so well so quickly, "it is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when" (Ice, Sir Fred Hoyle, 1981).

Now, back to the subject at hand, the Lateglacial period, 13.5 to 12.8 calybp, in Beringia, saw cooling temps, the extinction of the mammoth, expansion of shrub tundra, an open Ice Free Corridor, and a change in lithics, on both sides of the still available land bridge, somewhat away from the microblade industry to a leaf shaped and an occasional bi-face (Hoffecker and Elias, 2007). Clovis were well entrenched far to the southeast with well developed bi-face technology at that time. Swan Point, dated at 14.3 calybp, is microblade, and one of the oldest still accepted eastern Beringian sites; eg. Bluefish cave data has fallen apart.

So, we are still looking for boats.
I'm sorry, my responses are limited. You must ask the right question.

"The track of a glacier is as unmistakable as that of a man or a bear, and is as significant and trustworthy as any other legible inscription"
John Strong Newberry; 1873

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by dannan14 » Sat Aug 18, 2012 8:10 pm

Farpoint wrote:So, we are still looking for boats.
Ahh, boats. If only you knew how long we've been looking for boats on this site. i think you're fitting in quite well here Farpoint.

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Minimalist » Sat Aug 18, 2012 11:03 pm

I don't expect to find a boat.

But finding organisms across the sea implies that the got there somehow and walking and flying seem out of the question.
Something is wrong here. War, disease, death, destruction, hunger, filth, poverty, torture, crime, corruption, and the Ice Capades. Something is definitely wrong. This is not good work. If this is the best God can do, I am not impressed.

-- George Carlin

E.P. Grondine

Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by E.P. Grondine » Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:28 am

"the extinction of the mammoth" -

That kind of skates through what occurred, as if that extinction was connected to gradual global climate change.

And which leaves out the simultaneous and instantaneous extinctions of mega-fauna that occurred world-wide.

I assume that the microblade knives were developed for fileting fish and preparing other marine foods.

And how exactly did Jacque's Bluefish Cave site "fall apart"?

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Farpoint » Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:12 pm

The scapula was redated to the holocene.
I'm sorry, my responses are limited. You must ask the right question.

"The track of a glacier is as unmistakable as that of a man or a bear, and is as significant and trustworthy as any other legible inscription"
John Strong Newberry; 1873

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Farpoint » Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:23 pm

Boats, on pages 48, 49, and 50 in Charles Lyell's Antiquity of Man (1863) he reports dugout canoes up to fifty feet long at Glasgow. I have not checked the dating, but I am sure they are Holocene. But thats not the point. During the late Pleistocene big trees in the northern latitudes were scarce if not at all, eg. Beringia or the Atlantic ice sheet. It would seem that a more sophisticated technology would be required and all we have for certain are bone needles.

Or, is there more, dannan14? [By the way, thank you.]
I'm sorry, my responses are limited. You must ask the right question.

"The track of a glacier is as unmistakable as that of a man or a bear, and is as significant and trustworthy as any other legible inscription"
John Strong Newberry; 1873

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Farpoint » Sun Aug 19, 2012 5:13 pm

Farpoint wrote:The scapula was redated to the holocene.
Ok, it was a tibia, not a scapula. Since I erred, more information is required of me. The work of Cinq-Mars was excellent. However, a green worked tibia was dated to 27k RCYBP in 1973, making Bluefish potentially the oldest site. The tibia was redated to the late Holocene (Nelson 1986, Science Mag).

There were always issues with association of the lithics and the dateable material which makes the pollen data important in getting a handle on the timing of the occupation. The lithics are primarily associated with the transition to shrub tundra which means that the occupation occurred sometime after 13Ka caly;(Hoffecker and Elias, 2007).

My apologies.
I'm sorry, my responses are limited. You must ask the right question.

"The track of a glacier is as unmistakable as that of a man or a bear, and is as significant and trustworthy as any other legible inscription"
John Strong Newberry; 1873

E.P. Grondine

Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by E.P. Grondine » Mon Aug 20, 2012 7:21 am

Hi Farpoint -

Yes, palaeoclimate is always as constraint and indicator.
An excellent example you cite is the need for large trees for dugouts.
But in that case you also have to keep in mind hominid range with watercraft.

Another significant item to keep in mind is local micro-climates which may be far different than the surrounding climate.

In the case of Beringia, the ice free corridor to the south was open several times during the Pleistocene.

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Farpoint » Mon Aug 20, 2012 5:44 pm

Image

San Jon, the scale is in feet, compare to man's leg standing on the terrace.
I'm sorry, my responses are limited. You must ask the right question.

"The track of a glacier is as unmistakable as that of a man or a bear, and is as significant and trustworthy as any other legible inscription"
John Strong Newberry; 1873

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Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by Farpoint » Wed Aug 29, 2012 3:38 pm

Cactus Hill McAvoy 1996

Possible pine hearth 15,070 -+ 70 RCYBP
pre Clovis artifacts

Clovis working surface 10,920-+ 250 RCYBP

They walked from where?
I'm sorry, my responses are limited. You must ask the right question.

"The track of a glacier is as unmistakable as that of a man or a bear, and is as significant and trustworthy as any other legible inscription"
John Strong Newberry; 1873

dannan14
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Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2008 2:47 pm

Re: But Still Clinging to the "Land Bridge"

Post by dannan14 » Wed Aug 29, 2012 11:53 pm

Farpoint wrote:Or, is there more, dannan14? [By the way, thank you.]
No problem...and considering this subject is about things dug out of the ground i feel secure saying that there will always be more :P

Anyway, just saw this today.

http://www.sowetanlive.co.za/news/world ... outh-korea

8k years still is not 13k or 30k or whatever and there is only a small fragment, but some evidence tends to trump none hehe.

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